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MAY 1958 SPRING ISSUE 15c CDC 







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Sill ill M HUMBUG HOLIDAY ALBUM % jgf ggj 



SAINT PATRICK'S DAY 





NEXT ISSUE WE QO FANCY 


Humbug is raising its price 
to 25? with the next issue clue 
to rising operating costs', plus 
an insatiable appetite for 
money. 

We are going to print a 
standard magazine size so that 
you will no longer have to 
search for us amongst the 
comic-books. Now you will 
find us amongst the larger, 
more sophisticated publica- 
tions — the crayon coloring 
books. 

Note the subscription cou- 
pon in the back of this issue. 
Use it. You’ll never be able to 
get Humbugs so cheap again 
after April 10th, 1958, unless 
you trade or steal. 

On to the letters: 

Dear editor Harvey Kurtzman : 

The staff at Night Beat 
would like to extend thanks to 
you for appearing on Night 
Beat . . . Leonard Zweig 
Producer Night Beat 
Dumont TV, N.Y.C. 

Hey — anybody out there see 



TV AWARDS 3 

LOG OF SOLAR HAWKE 7 

WHO GETS KILLED 9,18.32 

SCIENCE EDUCATION 10 


Do you use a man’s deodor- 
ant? —Bob Taylor 

Royal Oak, Mich. 

Hjjfen 

Last night my son, age 14, 
went to the corner food store 
to purchase some comic books. 
Upon his return I looked over 
the books he had purchased. 



Two of them were Superman 
comics which are a little fan- 
tastic but not too questionable. 
Then I picked up this humbug 
magazine and I was flabber- 
gasted. Such TRASH . . . down- 
right filth . . . What grownup in 
their right mind would write 
such low-minded tripe and 
then present it to children. 
This is like going to the gar- 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

NEW SOLDIER'S MAhlt/AL. . 13 

SPORT CAR RACINQ 16 

QOLDY BOOK 19 


bage can for your supper. 

I am a member of the St. 
Walter’s Woman Club at 1 1 8th 
.and Westerp Ave., Chicago, 
111. and believe me at our 
very next meeting I am going 
to carry this magazine and 
make sure that this sort of 
reading material is brought to 
the attention of the committee 
in charge - . . 

This store where this book 
was bought is going to be 
named and after this month it 
will be checked 

—Mrs. R. Colburn 
Chicago, 111. 

I have read a Humbug for 
the first time and enjoy it very 
much, except for that awful 
cover of a nude woman. Your 
magazine is really clean, so 
why spoil it with a dirty cover? 

... if you continue to use 
covers of this type I will not 
buy your magazine. I do not 
object to the covers themselves 
as much as I do to the fact that 
I don’t want my friends to see 


IMPORTANT MESSAGE 23 

HUMBUG HERO OF MONTH 26 

SPRINQ TRAINING 27 

BAFJDAIDS 30 



me reading a magazine that 
from the cover appears to be a 
dirty book.— WiHlarn Ruehling 


In regard to your Feb. edi- 
tion.... “1957 in Revue” which 
I suppose you think was very 
funny, but in regard to your 
“outstanding shot” on Benny 
Hooper, I think it was in very 
bad taste. After all, thousands 
of people were praying for 
that little boy and I for one 
cried when he was rescued . . : 



Bad taste 

If it was my son (of which I 
have 2 of) I’d knock your 
block off. — Mrs. S. Hasay 
LoUhst Valley, N. Y. 


The boys (men, I should 
say) here at the Phi Delta 
House think your new mag is 
the “suavest.” — David Bremer 
Greencasde, Vt. 

. . . Between Humbug and 
The New Yorker life can go 
on. — Gene M. Woelke 

Enid, Okla. 

In Humbug there is a pic- 
ture drawn of Elvis Presley . . . 
1 was wondering if it’s possible 
that 1 could have the very 
same picture enlarged for my 
personal use. If possible I 
would like it to be 9 x 11 
inches. 

Despite your probable criti- 
cism of Elvis, 1 think it is the 
best dfcawing of him . . . 

1 will pay any postage or 
any other costs. 



Anything you can do for 
me will be deeply appreciated. 

—Diana Jean Anderson 
Seattle, Wash. 
Yon are beyond our help. — ed. 
■<&>'. 

Enclosed is the second issue 
of my exclusive Humbug fan 
magazine; SPOOF! ... I hope 
you’ll plug this mag in your 
letter cols . . . SPOOF! Pub- 
lished monthly by: 

Doug Brown 
405 Potter Ave. 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 

—Doug Brown 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 

We clods at St. Joseph’s 
Prep mainly want to start a 
Seymour Mednick fan club. 
Anyone interested send to: 
Seymour Mednick Fan Club 
69 10 Heyward Street 
Philadelphia 19, Pa. 

— Richard Corliss 
Phila., Pa. 


Here is an article that we 
thought was utterly (censored). 1 
Felice Zeller and May Glazer 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 



Utterly (censored) 


Back issues <4 Humbug are 
available at 20f per issue and 

quests for these, we’re binding 
a collection of lh^ first six: 
Humbug magazines between 
bard covers and selling the re- 
sultant book for $2.50 which 
is slightly more than cost to us. 



Complete collection. 


Address mail to HUMBUG 
598 Madison Aye., N.Y. 22, N.Y. 


I ELEVISION 



THE BEST 

TELEVISION 

COMMERCIALS 

1958 

What with Emmys and Oscars being 
issued this month, our magazine has de- 
cided to create an award for the best t.v. 
commercials of the year. 

It’s about time people stopped razzing 
the commercials— and so, we are giving — 
for quality and sincerity of purpose -t<* 
the following commercials, a HUMBUG 
award. 


I 





"Why Emily— how can 


“ I'm wearing my Play iron bra and girdle, darling - 




“Guess which hand holds the MNM. 


Beep Beep Beep Beep Beep Beep Beep Beep 



“ Don't broadcast bad breath! 




—If you don t want your radio to smell!'’ 




"Chained to the hot cigarette habit ? 


"Mary! These paper napkins always /all!' 




Break the hot cigarette habit! 


‘Bloink!’ 


“Excuse me, sir. I'm Manny the butler —down 


l‘m here to tell you about this new napkin 


Switch from hots to Colds! 


—end be chained by the Cold cigarette habit!’ 


“Mary! You should see what l just stepped on! ' 










& 




A mother with her child in the fields - 




Buy her only the best kind of .. .ah .. . ahem . . 



SCIENCE FICTION 



This is the earliest known attempt at Science Fiction. It was written in 1648. 


Ye Solar Hawke took wing, or flapped- 
off, as we saye,.this morning of ye Fiji, 
September, 1849. Court and Confellors, 
a0embed, witneffed our departure. Manye 
waved as our flout, winged shippe rofe 
flowly from the grownde. Betimes we 
watched the Earthe growe fmalle belowe. 
Soone London feemed but a dotte, and 
Terra ytself but a meare greene cannon- 
balle. Then darknefs fell. 

Sept. 7 . Paffed ye Moone. 

Sept. 8. Difficultie with our Meteorique 
Deflectyon mechanism todaye neceffitated 


lending a rapayre partye onto the outer 
hulle to. mayke adjyustments. This ys the 
fir ft tyme ye newe f pace-armour has beene 
tefted in actyual ufe. Yt performed ex- 
ceeding well; alfo, ye f pedal magnetique 
fhoes clung neitly to the hulle and f pared 
the wearers from being FLUNG out into 
space, but inayde a dreddfulle noyse within. 

Sept. 9. Sighted Mars, at 12 double- 
noon (fidereal tyme). Alfo, this daye, dif- 
covered stowaway aboard, hid in an un- 
ufed apparatus-locker: While on watche 
had heard ft range fcratchyng noyses; 


^Vtloate in the Jttcrundyncre £>Kye 

jiiyfo \kdartatuju, oa> rye. lAonottAaMe.^ Captcu/i and Camm~ 
jurOces.JfaaAe, aswb f/looto iAe, 


Log ° f t hc Solar Hawke 


threwe open cabinett and theyre perceived 
a young ladye, verye faire and neitly dreffed, 
who feemed no whit dijcompojed by my 
outraged expoftulations, nor by the, ordeal 
of her five dayes concealment in swych 
narrowe quart yers. She is ycleped GWEN- 
NA HARDY NG, and is sole heiress of the 
rich Sir ANDREW HAftDYNG; she is 
greene-eyed, redde-haired and verye fiery- 
tempered, meseemeth the f polled darling 
of an oVerindulgenl parent. Defpite my 
cold react yon towyatd her pre fence in our 
midft she wonne the hearts of all the crewe 
that night by cooky ng them " the firft goode 
mele they ete since leaving Terra". I would 
tafte none of yt, howyvyr, which mayde her 
Sulk moft charmingley. 

Sept. 10. Landed on Mars. A ere thinne 
but brealhyable. Difcovered manye new 
and curyous vegetable forms, all fmall and 
fcrublike, howyvyr, and feemingly innoc- 
uous. Collected fpecimens of every fpecies. 

Sept. 11. Sent partyes to explor the re- 
gion. One groupe returned with tales of 
having feen a giant (6 foote) polyp-like 
plante with waving upper fronds, long, 
ftalk and quadrupedal rootes by means of 
which, aftonishingly, it fled away oh theyr# 
approach. 

Sept. 12. Entire company went out, in 
groupes, in fearch of aforementioned 
“ movyng polyps". My groupe, confifting 
of myfelf, ye third mate and Miftrefs 
Hardyng, ftumbled on a covey of them, 
whereupon they attacked us in myfterious 
manner with ftrange paralyzyng rayes 
emitted from theyre upper branches. We 
fell downe, helplefs, and our arms were 
bownd. Thefe uglie creaty ures are now 
fhepherding us towyard fome unknown but 
doubtlefs gruefsme deftination. I am fcrib- 
bling this, covertly, as we encamp for the 
night. 

Sept. 13. Juft before dawn the third 
mate tryed to breake and runne. He was 


immediately cut downe by the polyp-men 
who fyred at him with fome fort of a 
difintegrating-piftol, and the pool fellowe 
vanished into fmithereens! Gwenna and I 
are now alone againft thefe vicious mon- 
fters. Heaven protect her, fweet lafs; for 
myself I Care Not. 

Sept. 14. This daye we reached our 
journeys ende, an immenfe metropolifs 
peopled by thefe polyp-men. We were ef- 
corted into a tall, vaulting arbour, the 
dwelling of theyre KING, and fhortly 
found ourf elves confronted by this Loathe- 
fome Monarch. Behinde his throne theyr 
hung a gigantique mappe on which were 
pictyured all the Plannets in theyr Orbitts. 
Be fide him flood a grim machine, a horrid 
raye projector of the fame fort as had been 
ufed to kille the mate, but vaftly larger; 
and by poynting to the mappe and then the 
weajypon he communicated his intention to 
DEFT ROY THE EARTH! A fit rye siezed 
me; while he thus boafted I fnatched 
Gwenna to my side, f prang for the trigger 
of the raye projector and fwung it wildly 
in a circle, firing as / did fn; nor did 1 cease 
until all trace of this repulfive civilizatyon 
had been blowne tb atonies! When all was 
levelled With the grownde, I took the 
fwooning Gwenna in my arms, revived her, 
jotted downe thefe notes, and then set off 
with her acrofs the desert. 

Sept. 15. We trudged all day, and then, 
toward evening, happening to look up into 
the sky e, to our great joy beheld the Shippe, 
which had flowne out in fearch of us. We 
fignalled frantikly, they saw us and droppd 
down, took us aboard, and, but for a brief 
stop hack at thedeflroyed city of the polyps, 
where we recovered the ftill-fmoking rave- 
projector (it will be highely ufeful back on 
Earthe againft the French), set an imme- 
diate courfe ftraight for home, where my- 
felf and Gwenna purpofe to be marryed at 
ye firft favourable opportunity . 

— Ed Fisher 


a 



FIND INC/ THE MUMMY ...“and you know who" gets killed. 


Don’t tell me 
you believe 
that ancient 
superstitious 
nonsense, 
my boy. 


The secret en- 
trance tb the 
tomb of Tut-en- 
Frut-en . . . 
how thrilling. 



CROSSINQ DEATH VALLEY ...“and you know who” gets killed. 


It’s a long walk to the next water- 

hole ... so you’d all better conserve 

your water — That means you too, pardner. 


I’ll decide how to 
conserve my own 
water myself, cowboy. 


* 


EDUCATION 


RUSSIA SPURS U.S. EDUCATION 

SPUTNIK SCOOP SHOWS UP OUR EDUCATIONAL WEAKNESS 



♦ THE NEW -science-oriented 
kindergarten area is vital 
first step in starting off 
impressionable young minds 
in the right direction. 


MISSILE ERA school busses fea- 
turing multi-stage compon- 
ents, can be easily dropped 
off, speeding daily pick-up 
and delivery of students. 

I 



AVERAGE ORD'NARY 'STUDENTS get the usual educational 
facilities, while the bright, gifted science students are 
given encouragement to help develop their talents. 



SCIENCE PU8UC RELATIONS courses 
all school levels, liniphasis will be pU 
news releases that make failures look i 


xill be required at 
:ed on the giving of 
s good as successes. 


since sputnik, a huge program to improve our educational system is underway. 
Of course, this is all in the field of science, and naturally the other subjects 
will have to be neglected even more. But then again, in a world that is sitting 
on top of a hydrogen Bomb, who needs subjects like art, music, literature and 
philosophy? Encouraging those things could only lead to. .. to. ..er... ugh. ..peace. 



not ail educators are taken in by the prestige and financial rewards of fhe science program. Above are pictured some who 
stand up for their own subjects. Our hats are off to these valiant individualists who refusd to give up their ideals. 



ANSWER FOLLOWING QUESTIONS BY CHECKING YES OR NO. 

1. Werner Von Braun is a U.S. rocket expert. CD CD 30 points 

2. Vanguard was a U.S. missile. CD CD 20 points 

3. Sputnik is a Russian fairy tale. CD CD 30 points 

4. Radioactivity is a working disc jockey. CD CD 15 points 

5. Johann Sebastian Bach was a composer. CD CD 2 points 

6. Michaclangelo is president of Italy. CD CD 2 points 

7. The Pilgrims looked for religious freedom. CD CD Vz point 

8. Philosophy is a dead language. CD CD Vi point 


i.q. tests will help separate worthy sci- fraternity initiations will get some 

ence pupils from the worthless others. new twists from the big science kick. 



Our friends at Ballantine Book Publishers have asked us to advertise their line 
of crazier paper-backed-books. But they warned us to advertise all titles equally, 
without prejudice or favor for the Humbug Digest. Now would we do a thing like that? 



Send books checked above. 

Name 

Mail to Ballantine Books, 
12 



I will pay 4(V for single copies or $1.00 for three copies.t 


Address — : 1 ' 

Department Bug 2, 101 Fifth A ve., New York 3,N. Y. 


FM 21-100 HUM 


WAR DEPARTMENT 


BASIC FIELD MANUAL 

A- 

U. S. ARMNAYIATOR’S 
HANDBOOK 

May, 1958 

Prepared under the direction of LARRY SIEGEL 
former PFC of the former U. S. Army 

«*sasr 


f a 

Notes— The pronAhd 


and Air Force missile programs to help us overtake 
Russia’s rocket lead has been found insufficient. The 
government has now decided to have COMPLETE uni - 
fication of the three branches. 

Instead of a clumsy system , whereby three different 
groups of men each step on the other’s toes , it has 
been decided to form a clumsy system , whereby OISE 
group of men steps on their OfFIS toes. 

The new U.S. fighting man is now a combination of 
all three branches. His group is called: THE ARM • 
N AVIATOR CORPS. 


This is an excerpt from its Basic Field Manual. 


IS 


CHAPTER 1 

ARMNA VIATOR COURTESY AND SONGS 

Section I. Armnaviator military courtesy. 

II. Armnaviator Corps songs. 

Ill Wearing the uniform. 

Section I 

MILITARY COURTESY 


® ef0 j C an officer was always a man whom you picked out from the other men 

and saluted. Among enlisted men this was called military courtesy. 

In the new Armnaviator Corps, an officer is always the man whom you pick out from the 
o er flying land sailors or sailing airmen dog-faces or marching sea aviators-and salute. Among 
enlisted men this is called impossible. 6 

j Following are some of the more common.occasions on which you may have the opportunity 
to demonstrate your Armnaviator military courtesy: 

a When you are m the air or on the sea and you spy an officer on land, you come to a com- 
your right eye Uy ° # y ° Ur e " Ein ° “ Mt “ P your anchor and sna P y‘ our ba 5' on6t smartly to 

b. When you are tin land or on the sea and you see an officer in the air (with your remaining 
left eye , you come to it complete halt, lift your rifle to present arms, or lower your life-boats, and 
hand salute. He will return your salute by dipping his wings. 

c. When you are in the air, on the sea and on land simultaneously (as you will be from time to 
time ) and the officer is also in the air, on the sea, and on land simultaneously, come to a complete 
halt, switch off your anchor, and bring your propeller to present arms.' 

d \S you report. to an officer in his office, remove your parachute, take three quick steps for- 
ward, loosen your life preserver and salute, “Sir, reports to . 

He will respond with a rifle salute, unless he is on the bridge, at which time he will dip his wings 

(Mote: the entire procedure is reversed, if the officer reports to you.) 

e. If your ship is sailingalongside a plane with 'an officer aboard, make sure that you are al- 

ways on the officer s left, unless he is mounted, at which time you should be on his right. If yon 
are also mounted, your horse should salute. 3 

f. It is unnecessary to salute in the following instance: when an officer passes you and you have 
unfriendly fora” ” y °“ are crashing in flames-providing the officer is a member of an 


Section II 

ARMNAVIATOR CORPS SONGS 

■ 1 ■ corps-is a singing corps. And the following Armnaviator Corps songs best express 

the spirit of your organization: p 


a) OVER HILL, UNDER SEA 
Over hill, under sea, we will fly to victory. 

That’s the U. S. Armnaviator Song. 

Forward march through the air, 

30 knots and we'll be there. 

That’s the U. S. Armnaviator Song. 

For it’s Hi-Hi-Hee 

In the Flying Navy Infantry, 

Shout out your numbers loud and strong 
(TWO-THREE-FAW) 

So on land we’ll flow as we cry, "Geronimo!” 
That’s the U. S. Armnaviator Song. 

b) ANCHORS AWEIGH 
Anchors aweigh, my boy, fly skies of gray. 

The infantry will lead the way, and so^r like 

a jay through the bay, bay, bay, bay - 
Now that we're navy men and all wear army gray, 
We’re loyal air cadets, but tell us whom we 
turn to for our pay! 


e) OFF WE GO 

Off we go into the wide blue ocean. 

Digging deep into the sun. 

Here they come, up in the sky in hiotion, 

Fighting tanks, a thousand and dne. 

Blast the foe — oh, oh, we’ve got a notion 

The enemy troops, OUR uniforms wore. 

We live amused or We die confused. 

Hey! Nothing can stop the Armnaviator Corps! 

d) FROM THE HALLS 
OF MONTEZUMA 

From the halls of Montezuma to the shores 
of Tripoli 

We will never be united with our sister 
branches, three 

We are loyal to our fighting corps, and to 
our movie screens. 

John Wayne could not make pictures ’thout 
United States Marines. 


Section III 

WEARING THE UNIFORM 




SPORTS 

SPORT CAR RACINQ 

GLAMOROUS SPORT DRAWS LARGE CROWDS 

The gay international sports car racing seasori 
is now getting underway. The courses will pro- 
vide the maximum in thrills due to picturesque 
country roads and curious peasants who line the 
way. This year as last, there’s a plentiful sup- 
ply' of curious peasants, and the race fan can 
look forward to action. And with lurk 





" ; ' I 

ACODiNreX 
i rfW'&ii 




FINDINQ A SOU VEN I ER ...“and- you know who” gets killed. 


Watch your step! 
Remember what the 
Captain said 
about booby traps! 


I will dive one more 
time . . . then, no more. 


DIVINQ FOR P EA R L ... “and you know who” gets killed. 


— you’d better 
keep diving, 
prince, or your 
sister may just 
get hurt. 


Do not listen! . 
The handsome 
American warned 
me these two 
were bad. 


18 


EDUCATION 



Teaches the order and use of the 



with beautiful illustrations for coloring and straining 
the eyes. Large size type — so easy 1 16 read, an illiterate 
can understand. Recommended for ages 1-2. 









S is f ° r 

Mednick 


is for 
■ Tran 

ccndcn 
jfctalism 


TT is for 

_Ewe 






A. Lincoln r.„ 


p«» jo a dentalist '«■' 


■ Hey! You? j 






W' s f ° r 

" ’ two 
U’s 


marks 
the Spot: 

(S\ {&)'/$)„ 

Vinter at de - 
Vishing Veil 


-doubl^^^J ewe 


V f ’,/ 




for 

““Yolk 

■ Yoke 


M is for 
Zleep 

z 

s 

z 


is for 
Cursing 

a dirty Yoke 

11 


w Jf fast a Zleep 


""™"' a Curse | 



The following four 
pages are like nothing 
you have ever read 
in a magazine before. 

In a dramatic editorial session last month, the edi- 
tors decided, that considering the time of year, the 
following article must be published. 

We will probably receive violent reactions to this 
article— praise and heated criticism. But this is the 
risk one takes in being bold and willing to take a stand. 

Remember— the following is like nothing you have 
ever read in a magazine. 


Now steel yourself and turn the page. 



23 


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Conltmud on pair H 



SPORTS 


wpie ballplayer^ sharpen their 
skills down south for the coming 
gpnnant campaign, few are aware 
of*tfie sgtfhg training going on 
up norm. A visit to any ball 


park would reveal the serioSS 
activity of the diehard Imsb- 
ball fans getting into con|f§non 
for important roles they muar 
play in the approaching season. 1 ' 


>st fans do not throw anything fancy. Her 


PITCHING 




SLIDING— A slide successfully executed 
can change the whole appearance of the 
game. Great speed and agility are required 
to avoid being thrown out by the opposition. 


A FIELDING— A great save is admired by 
everyone, including opponents. For years 
frustrated vendors have not bgen able to 
get anything past the fielder pictured here. 


DOUBLE PLAY-Very tricky. If he’s 
out at second and then can't get back 
to first bag, fan is D.R victim. 
Dummies are used for practice only. 



HITTING — A good swing develops 
power. It is wise to. practice 
against a variety of opponents. 
This fellow does so by occasionally 
changing pennants on punch bag. 


1 BASF. STEALING -This fan displays some 
real base stealing. In fact, there’s none baser. 
Practices with papier mache bottles for fear 
of brealdng valuable, real deposit bottles. 



SIGNALS --No baseball season can get 
underway without thorough knowledge by 
all of these vital signals. A misunderstood 
4 or disobeyed signal could spell disaster. 


29 




ADHESIVE BANDAQE5 


Little kiddies tussling, getting bruises 
playing cowboys and indians, are 
indirectly responsible for great ad- 
vances in the field of medical dress- 


* 

IM 

m 

55 


Poison design for the little dulfer who 

wants a label 

t - ^§§ : • * 

Belly button desigu will provide hours of fun and play. 






spider — looks just like the real thing. 


Nail-head design — looks like it's driven right io there. 
* Caution : Do not place on open wound'. 



ings — specifically, the imprinting 
of adhesive bandages with gay de- 
signs. This trend will most surely pro- 
duce the following 


30 0 0 O O Q Q O 

I'O.OOOOOOO 



Plunger tape for that uncooperative rascal, can be shot on. 



Hidden, dye-tilled pocket gives real clfect of bleeding.dS« 

r ‘N 




ii ir ☆ THE HUM1UQ AWARD ☆' * 



Dedicated to those' who give to our 
Missile Program so generously' of their emotions and 
without whose contribution we could do, this page honors 


x 



^Palrt 

HUMBUQ HEROES OF MONTH 


JUDGES 


itlnued from page 25 



APRIL FOOL! 



A QUIET N ! Q H T . . . “and you know who” gets killed. 


Father always promised me a 


. Secure on a modem float- 
ing hotel. Yes mother . . . this 
is the only way to travel! 


THE B I Q JOB ... “and you know who” gets killed. 



■ a gallant band of amiable oddballs creates a hip and hopped-up humor 


The hard core of the Kurtzman crew 
are all roughly the same age and have 
known each other since boyhood. Rum- 
man, Elder, Jaffce and Humbug Man- 
aging Editor Harry Chester all attended 
The High School of Music and Art in 


New York, where Kurtzman brightened 
the bulletin boards with crude mimeo- 
graphed satire while Jaffce and Elder 
convulsed the lunchroom crowd with 
comic pantomime and ail extensive 
repertoire of vocal sound effects. 





told 

’ writer 


Humbug boc 


by ka Carnall 

Once upon a time, In faraway 
tew York, a group of artists, con- 
ilstlng of Harvey Kurtzman, Jack 
Itvls, Bill Elder, and Wally 
good, were putting out a series of 
omlc magazines never to be 
quailed. They published stories 
Mut war, horror, science fiction. 


of faults, bu 
i dependable.' 
a little sociable 


(Elder, j 
EtJe and 
*T : write 


.STATE. 


I for Brooklyn Colltgs, 


article by rolf malcolm 

W.i 


f the eiOage VOICE, 

j the 

village square 


by John Wilcock 

From Mad to Madder 

Harvey K 

^rri'ookfiike rrsrasr 


1 nTH£P#)LM 


ly Sidney Skeltlty m 


Reflections 

By GORDON LATTEY 

THEYRE TALKING ABOUT 


H: 


[ ere are clippings about HUMBUG 
from Sidney Skolsky's Hollywood 
column .. . from a college and high 
school paper . . . from a couple of city 
papers . . . and from Playboy magazine. 
HUMBUG is clearly the most talked 
about magazine in its class of the Buster 
Brown throwaway, Muscles Today, etc. 
Don't miss a single issue of this phe- 
nomenon. Subscribe this minute. 


I | Enter my subscription 10 Humbug. 1 am 
enclosing $2.00 for the next 14 issues. 
P] Send me these back issues (circled) at 
20g per: 1234 5 6789 

[ | Send me the hard-bound Humbug collection 
(see page 2 ) for which I am enclosing $2.50. 


■ "saaasaK: - w: zzrzs * ’YSMN& 

- bj VYi *" , •‘ Humbu «” •nd » H.ppy HolidJf 


J ai 

ui 

inc 

AmiHffcali f}p%ays, ■ 


time, popular 
shows, and even The 





Fabulous Opportunities Are Waiting 
For Those Who Take My Training 


GRQ TRAINED 
THESE MEN 


I 

...» .n I.O. 1 

■ 0H<1 I ' 


Millions of TV-radio 
sets break down 
daily. Naturally a 
wave of panic surges 
through a family that 
» ..... this happens to when 
k!»« they realize the pro- 
grams they will miss 
that evening. This is 
where the trained 
technician steps in to 
set things aright 

again. And for this 

mMm nliilr ™* Ie service to his 
ne» >i.m fellow man, he is am- 
- Hen Franklin p [y rewar ded. He is 
regarded by those he 
has helped in the 
% same reverent man- 
“b ner that they regard 
their family physi- 
" c ‘ an - At this point 
'in.k'ini °more he can do and charge 
n U mo»‘n n n'lr- anything he cares to 
Monner • . . and usually does. 
G.R.Q. TRAINED MEN 
GAIN ALL AROUND 
But after you've tak- 
en the G.R.Q. course 
you will learn to 
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COME AND GET THE BIG MONEY 


I Gel Rich Quick Institute of Electron. ' 

J Washington D. C. and A. C. I V ‘ ‘TB